Abstract

In this essay, I argue that the Mano River War should be understood as a conflict to which the ubiquitous presence of digital media was crucial. This was a war structured by the economy of attention. To profit in this economy, combatants and non-combatants were required to play to an audience that they knew was there, but often could only sense or apprehend in the most abstract way. The realities of constantly being available to be seen were crucial to understanding the spectacular performance of violence in this conflict.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1518
Print ISSN
0003-5491
Pages
pp. 949-975
Launched on MUSE
2011-11-19
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.