Abstract

This article aims to reimagine Jewish American literary history outside a nationalist framework that assumes Jewish American literature represents a recognizable historical subject. Free of the historicist expectation that its job is the coordination of literature with a historical Jewish subject, Jewish American literary history would not disregard the problem of identity, but would function as a counterdiscourse of identity. In this essay I focus on Abraham Cahan’s “The Imported Bridegroom,” which subverts the expectation of identity’s self-evidence, making available a non-nationalist Jewish American literary history oriented not by recognition and continuity, but by desire and emergence.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-658X
Print ISSN
0026-7724
Pages
pp. 276-299
Launched on MUSE
2011-06-04
Open Access
No
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