Abstract

During the 1990s, West Africa was ravaged by conflicts that required ECOWAS to intervene by sending a regional military force, ECOMOG, into Liberia and Sierra Leone. This paper analyzes the lessons learned from ECOWAS’s military intervention in Liberia and Sierra Leone. It argues that, while ECOMOG faced daunting challenges—disagreements among ECOWAS member states, financial constraints, equipment and logistical problems—key lessons were learned that subsequently shaped the military and diplomatic interventions by ECOWAS in Côte D’Ivoire in 2003 and Togo in 2005, respectively. ECOWAS learned that the impartiality of an intervention force and leaders’ political will to intervene through financial and logistical support may be crucial to averting similar crises in the subregion.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 3-24
Launched on MUSE
2011-03-11
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.