Abstract

Much of the critical response to Catherine Sinclair's Holiday House (1839) obscures the differences between young siblings Harry and Laura Graham, as well as how adults respond differently to each child's mischief. A close reading of the text shows that although Harry and Laura frequently scheme and play together, gender influences their mischief, its dangers, and its consequences. Furthermore, the siblings' mischief and gender—as well as the adults' response to the children's mischief and gender—contribute to how each child is raised to fulfill a gender-appropriate role in Great Britain's imperial project.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 64-88
Launched on MUSE
2011-02-24
Open Access
No
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