Abstract

Henry Clay's reputation was based on his skill in formulating legislative compromises between competing positions, enacting the attribute of prudence. This approach proved unsuccessful in the context of a heated election campaign. Focusing on a series of public letters Clay issued during 1844, this analysis traces his rhetorical difficulties in the campaign and suggests the limitations of a rhetorical stance based on compromise.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-5238
Print ISSN
1094-8392
Pages
pp. 79-96
Launched on MUSE
2003-04-30
Open Access
No
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