Abstract

Jean-Paul Sartre's surprising biographies of Tintoretto, Calder, Giacometti, Baudelaire, Gide, Camus, and Genet mirror his own autobiography, The Words. The structures of these still-life portraits express Sartre's primary philosophical preoccupations: bad faith and the flight from time, radical freedom and the sense of one's own emptiness, and embodiment and identification with the look of the Other. Although these biographies are told as narratives of choice and creativity, the formative agents in these lives are Time and Chance.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 329-339
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-02
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.