Abstract

Intercultural and interdisciplinary approaches are today rightfully heralded as the most promising ways forward in the theoretical study of art and aesthetics. But that does not mean such approaches have not been considered before. In the late nineteenth century, the philosopher Ernst Grosse did just that, encapsulating his proposals in what he called the "ethnological method." Moreover, he identified a series of predecessors who had either applied a cross-cultural perspective or drawn on various disciplines in examining art and aesthetics. This essay brings to light a forgotten but surprisingly "modern" tradition of art theoretical thought.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 302-312
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-02
Open Access
No
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