Abstract

Drawing on her own attachment to Nancy Drew and her reactions in her diary written when she was thirteen, Lundin suggests that Nancy Drew acted as her alter ego, a being who "inspired my imagination, literary ambitions, and ethical conscience." Despite being a fictional character in a series, Nancy Drew took on the trappings of the fifteenth-century allegory, allowing the child reader to test whether the world is a place to be trusted. Drew's benevolence and heroic deeds showed the possibilities of achievement for young women.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6563
Print ISSN
0147-2593
Pages
pp. 120-130
Launched on MUSE
2003-03-11
Open Access
No
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