Abstract

Steve Fuller has argued that a scientific discovery will not be recognized unless it can be justified within the history of the relevant science. He cites Mendel's work on genetics, which was not recognized until thirty-five years after its publication, as an example. This essay argues that Mendel's work comes out of the tradition of work by both agricultural breeders and academics in nineteenth century Austria. Thus, Fuller is mistaken, and one must look elsewhere for the neglect of Mendel's work. This essay also places Mendel's work within the philosophy of Jan Comenius, whose work was very likely known to Mendel.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9274
Print ISSN
1063-6145
Pages
pp. 226-241
Launched on MUSE
2010-05-30
Open Access
No
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