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  • Biographies

Giorgio Agamben teaches at the Università IUAV di Venezia, the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris and previously at the University of Macerata in Italy. He also has held visiting appointments at several American universities, European Graduate School and at Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf. Agamben's best known work includes his investigations of the concepts of state of exception and homo sacer. Agamben received the Prix Européen de l'Essai Charles Veillon in 2006.

Richard Bailey is a doctoral candidate in the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney. His research explores ontology, power, and resistance in the context of biopower and the camp, looking primarily at the experience of detainee resistance in Australian immigration detention. Richard is the author of "Strategy, rupture, rights: reflections on law and resistance in immigration detention," published in the Australian Feminist Law Journal, 2009, and "Up against the wall: bare life and resistance in the camp," published in Law and Critique, 2009.

Banu Bargu is an Assistant Professor of Politics at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College where she teaches political theory. Her research interests include theories of sovereignty, violence, democracy, republicanism, and radical politics. She is the author of Human Weapons: The Death Fast Struggle in Turkey, 2000-2007 (forthcoming). She is currently completing a new book manuscript entitled Sovereignty, Sacrifice, and Sedition. She can be reached at bargub@newschool.edu.

P. J. Brendese is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Government at The College of William and Mary. His work focuses on the politics of memory, transitional justice, and race. He recently completed a book manuscript entitled The Power of Memory: Democratizing the Presence of the Past and the Politics of Possibility. His current book project is entitled The Race of Secular Time: Engendering Intergenerational Justice. He can be reached at pjbren@wm.edu

George Ciccariello-Maher is a Ph.D. candidate in political theory at the University of California, Berkeley, whose work has appeared in Monthly Review, Journal of Black Studies, Qui Parle, Human Architecture, Listening, Radical Philosophy Review, and The Commoner. He is currently completing two projects: a dissertation on revolutionary subjectivity in Georges Sorel and Frantz Fanon, and a people's history of Venezuela's Bolivarian Revolution entitled We Created Him. He can be reached at gjcm@berkeley.edu

Justin Clemens has published extensively on psychoanalysis, contemporary European philosophy, and Australian art and literature. Recent books include the poetry collection Villain (Hunter Publishing 2009) and the novella Black River (re.press 2007), illustrated by Helen Johnson. With Christopher Dodds and Adam Nash, he is the creator of several online art-works, notably Babelswarm (2008) and Autoscopia (2009). He is currently editing The Jacqueline Rose Reader (Duke UP, forthcoming) with Ben Naparstek, and Alain Badiou: Key Concepts (Acumen, forthcoming) with A.J. Bartlett. He is also the co-editor of major collections on Jacques Lacan and Giorgio Agamben. He is Secretary of the Lacan Circle of Melbourne, and teaches at the University of Melbourne.

Samantha Frost is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, the Gender and Women's Studies Program, and the Unit for Criticism at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her book Lessons from a materialist thinker: Hobbesian reflections on ethics and politics (Stanford University Press, 2008) was selected for the First Book Award by the Foundations of Political Theory section of the American Political Science Association. She is currently completing a manuscript entitled Hobbes and Heteronomy: Essays on Materialism and Politics and beginning a new project entitled Delusions of Autonomy: Rethinking Agency and Politics.

Jinee Lokaneeta is an Assistant Professor in Political Science at Drew University, New Jersey. Her areas of interest include Law and Violence, Public Law, Political Theory (Postcolonial, Feminist and Marxist theory), Jurisprudence, and Cultural Studies. Jinee's research focuses on the Debates on Law, Violence, and State Power. She has previously published in journals such as Studies in Law, Politics and Society and Economic and Political Weekly. Final revisions on this essay were completed during Fall 2009 that she spent as a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law and Society, University of California, Berkeley. She is...

Additional Information

ISSN
1092-311X
Print ISSN
2572-6633
Launched on MUSE
2010-03-28
Open Access
No
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