Abstract

Today some foreign observers have begun to claim significant changes in the North Korean "socialist realism" literary tradition, such as a broadening of the permissible range of topics and even some concessions to alternative discourses. This article investigates whether the most favored branch of contemporary North Korean literature, namely, "rural fiction," has indeed become a conduit of political liberalization and, if so, to what extent. The author analyzes the core messages that North Korean creative writings about the countryside are disseminating today and considers these messages in relation to the Party's recent directives in regard to agricultural or rural development.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1529
Print ISSN
0145-840X
Pages
pp. 69-100
Launched on MUSE
2010-01-22
Open Access
No
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