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THE HENRY JAMES REVIEW Volume 14, Number 1 Winter 1993 Table of Contents Imminence and Immanence: Isabel Archer's Temporal Predicament in The Portrait of a Lady. By Jonathan Warren...................1 Narrative Sympathy in The Bostonians. By Kristin Boudreau..............17 Homotextual Duplicity in Henry James's "The Pupil." By Helen Hoy......34 The Secret of the Spectacle: Epistemology and Commodity Display in The Ambassadors. By Richard Salmon......................43 Sexuality and the Aesthetic in The Golden Bowl. By Hugh Stevens........ 55 The Tell-Tale Representation: James and The Sense of the Past. By Susan S. Williams......................................72 The Artist that Was Used Up: Henry James's "Private Life." By Adam Bresnick........................................87 Mapping Conjecture in Henry James and Joseph Conrad: A Stylistic Approach. By Barry Stampfl.........................99 Review of Elsa Nettels, Language, Race, and Social Class in Howell's America. By James Robert Payne....................115 Review of Sara S. Chapman, Henry James's Portrait of the Writer as Hero. By Donald Wolff.................................... 117 Review of Millicent Bell, Meaning in Henry James. By Priscilla L. Walton.....................................................120 Review of Ignas K. Skrupselis and Elizabeth M. Berkeley, eds., The Correspondence of William James, Vol. 1: William and Henry, 1861-1884. By William E. Cain...........................122 From the Editor Here at last is the very late first issue of volume 14, which should have been in the hands of subscribers some seven months ago. It is nevertheless an issue with which we are deeply pleased, featuring the best essays submitted for the first annual Don Holliday Prize, a competition cosponsored by the Henry James Society and the Joseph Conrad Society (U.K.) and funded through the generosity of Mr. Don Holliday. The authors of Don Holliday Prize submissions in this issue are Hugh Stevens (winner for the best essay on Henry James), Barry Stampfl (winner for the best James-Conrad essay), Adam Bresnick (honorable mention in the James essay competition), Kristin Boudreau, Richard Salmon, Jonathan Warren, and Susan S. Williams (whose name I inadvertently omitted from a list in volume 13 of prize submissions slated for publication in 1993). I am also delighted to announce the winners of the second annual Don Holliday Prize: they are Julie Grossman, "Lost Objects of Vision and Disillusioning Images—'It's the Real Thing, ' ' winner for the best essay on Henry James; Vivienne J. Rundle, ' 'Defining Frames: The Prefaces of Henry James and Joseph Conrad," winner for the best essay on James and Conrad; and David Liss, "The Fixation of Belief in 'The Figure in the Carpet': Henry James and Peircean Semiotics," honorable mention in the Henry James essay competition. These essays will be published in a future number of the HJR, as will, I hope, two other essays that struck the judges (Paul Armstrong and me) as particularly strong submissions, Collin Meissner's "The Princesss Casamassima: James's ' dirty intellectual fog' ' ' and Andrew J. Moody 's" 'The Harmless Pleasure of Knowing': Privacy in the Telegraph Office and James's 'In the Cage.'" The winner of the prize for the best essay on Joseph Conrad is Sandra Dodson, "Lord Jim and the Inauguration of a Modern Sibylline"; Ms. Dodson's essay will be published in The Conradian. We are still in Henry James's sesquicentennial year, and I want to report at least briefly (with the hope of saying more in the next two issues) about the scholarly meetings and other programs and exhibitions in New York City this spring, however unabashedly anachronistic it may be to write of events that ran from mid-April through early July in an issue the cover date of which precedes those events by many months. One could hardly have been present for all of the commemorative activities, but recognizing that I was nevertheless very sorry, after years of planning for the Sesquicentennial, that I could be in New York only briefly, thus missing many special occasions, notably the series of lectures and discussions arranged by Harold Augenbraum at The Mercantile Library of New York (including a staged reading of Guy Domville that left everyone who has told me about it puzzled by the failure of the play on the London stage), the tour deforce performance Irene Worth gave at The Pierpont...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. v-127
Launched on MUSE
2010-03-25
Open Access
No
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