Abstract

This article analyzes the complicated relationship between photography and preservation, using the studio-residence of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in Mexico City as a case study. The house, designed by architect Juan O'Gorman in the early 1930s, was documented in celebrated photographs, and these photographs have become a major and often contradictory preservation tool against surviving architectural records, which function as a parallel and perhaps less authentic history for conservators. Tárrago Mingo argues that preservation's reliance on photography as an inherent truthful index of the past should be questioned, lest photographs be preserved rather than buildings.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1934-6026
Print ISSN
1549-9715
Pages
pp. 50-67
Launched on MUSE
2009-11-26
Open Access
No
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