Notes on Contributors
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Transition 10.4 (2001) 160



Notes on Contributors


Yvette Christiansë teaches African American and South African literature at Fordham University. She is the author of Castaway, a book of poetry, and is at work on I, Sila, a novel, from which her story in this issue is adapted.

Abdulrazak Gurnah was born in Zanzibar in 1948 and is the author of Memory of Departure, Admiring Silence, and Paradise, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. He teaches literature at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England. His new book, By the Sea, is published by the New Press.

Amitava Kumar teaches English at Pennsylvania State University. He is the author of Passport Photos, published by University of California Press. His essay "Louder Than Bombs" appeared in Transition 79.

Michelle Lamunière is a doctoral student in the Department of Art History at Boston University and an intern in the Department of Photographs at the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University. Her writing has appeared in History of Photography and Southern Historian.

Rafael Marques, an independent journalist living in Luanda, Angola, is Southern Africa coordinator for the Open Society Institute.

Riccardo Orizio, a former foreign correspondent for the Italian daily Corriere della Sera, works for CNN in Atlanta and travels frequently to Africa. His book Lost White Tribes is published by The Free Press.

Kelefa Sanneh is the deputy editor of Transition. His essay on Molefi Kete Asante, "After the Beginning Again," appeared in Transition 87.

Michela Wrong, a foreign correspondent based in London, has written for Reuters, the Sunday Times, and the Financial Times. Her book about Zaire under Mobutu Sese Seko, In the Footsteps of Mr. Kurtz: Living on the Brink of Disaster in Mobutu's Congo, is published by HarperCollins. Her essay "The Emperor Mobutu" appeared in Transition 81/82.

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