Abstract

This article explores the development of security discourses and, in particular, what I term the citizen–state security bargain in Canada since Confederation. The analysis focuses on how various security discourses have lent legitimacy to the state and helped to fashion a sense of national community and citizen identity. A historical tracking of Speeches from the Throne illustrates the ways in which the mid-twentieth-century enunciation of the citizen–state bargain as social security has been progressively surpassed and circumscribed by individualized pronouncements of public safety.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1712-5278
Print ISSN
0042-0247
Pages
pp. 687-708
Launched on MUSE
2009-08-07
Open Access
No
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