Abstract

Ethnic divisions and nationalism dominate the scholarship on the Church’s efforts to incorporate immigrants in the decades around 1900. By studying nuns’ perceptions of their place in the Church in their own words, the author argues that female religious may not have prioritized ethnic distinctions as highly as their male counterparts did. Examining how founding members of the Petites Franciscaines de Marie (PFM) understood their ethnic identity in relation to their identity as nuns, this article challenges prevailing interpretations of nationalism among ethnic Catholics in the United States, while suggesting the importance of incorporating women’s views into a fuller understanding of church history.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-0708
Print ISSN
0008-8080
Pages
pp. 515-545
Launched on MUSE
2009-06-27
Open Access
No
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