Abstract

This article investigates Henry James's The Princess Casamassima to stress how realism emerges as a powerful personal and collective reparatory fantasy. By analyzing the "unnatural alliances" that mark Hyacinth's options throughout the novel, this article emphasizes how the personal narrative (Hyacinth's family history) is entangled in the collective narrative (the Revolution), and how the realist plot of personal drama echoes the revolutionary plot written out on the grand social scale. In fact, it is argued, both evolve as responses to a highly conflicted drama of filiation (akin to a Freudian family romance), in which deficient origins demand reenactment and supplementation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 144-161
Launched on MUSE
2009-05-20
Open Access
No
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