Abstract

After his 1919 demobilization, yet before writing The Gift (1925), Marcel Mauss developed his concept of the "total human being" (l'homme total) as a methodological spur in works such as "L'expression obligatoire des sentiments" (1921). This translation and introduction to "The obligatory expression of feelings" highlights Mauss's post-war transition to psycho-physiological research and the concept of totality. Here, Mauss considers Australian "greeting by tears" as a synchronized performance of mind, body, and soul. We argue that Mauss's post-war concerns had crystallized around the omnipresent threat of loss-of-humanity and his war-survivor's scepticism toward absolute conceptions of individual and collective sovereignty.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1518
Print ISSN
0003-5491
Pages
pp. 279-309
Launched on MUSE
2009-04-05
Open Access
N
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.