Abstract

In this article, I use Donne’s offhand description of composition as hawking as the basis for a consideration of his depictions of the motions and trajectories of the writing mind. I examine Donne’s descriptions of the mental processes of writing in three different sites—in the study, on horseback, and beside the family hearth—in his letters and poetry, focusing in particular on three poems that exemplify each physical location: “Satire One,” “Goodfriday, 1613. Riding Westward,” and “Valediction: Forbidding Mourning.”

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 67-86
Launched on MUSE
2009-02-13
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.