Abstract

The London-based NGO Anti-Slavery was founded in 1839. For almost all its history, it remained a small group, working primarily through informal links to British parliamentarians. Pressure from the group made a significant though indirect impact on the 1926 League of Nations Slavery Convention and the 1956 United Nations Supplementary Convention. Anti-Slavery’s focus has shifted from chattel slavery to contemporary forms of slavery, which remain poorly defined in international law. This article examines both the evolution of Anti-Slavery and the League’s and United Nations failure to establish an effective monitoring group, which Anti-Slavery has consistently pressed for, albeit unsuccessfully.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-794X
Print ISSN
0275-0392
Pages
pp. 70-128
Launched on MUSE
2009-02-05
Open Access
No
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