Abstract

While early reviews emphasized Coraline's gothic qualities and expressed reservations about the appropriateness of the book for young readers, Neil Gaiman contended that children were impervious to his novel's frightening elements. This paper argues that although categorical claims about children's readerly responses are problematic, the uncanny elements of Gaiman's novel open up the possibility of theorizing a double readership. It further contends that Coraline's varied responses to the uncanny disclose her psychological development and that Gaiman's technical innovations to the narrative pattern he inherits from Carroll allow for a particularly nuanced treatment of the psychological costs of maturation.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 390-407
Launched on MUSE
2009-01-16
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.