Abstract

The rise and fall of W.B. Yeats's enthusiasm for Rabindranath Tagore as a poet is analyzed here as due primarily to Yeats's own changing aspirations for restoring a pristine Ireland. Reinforcing this psychological interpretation is a post-colonial argument that finds Yeats, notwithstanding his opposition to colonial rule in Ireland and India, as unable to appreciate the Bengali poet as intellectually and politically a fully mature and autonomous individual. Once Tagore had rejected his British knighthood in protest against the Jallianwalla Bagh massacre, it is argued, he no longer fitted the benign but condescending stereotype of serene, spiritual Oriental that had helped propel him to the Nobel Prize.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1712-5278
Print ISSN
0042-0247
Pages
pp. 1005-1024
Launched on MUSE
2008-12-31
Open Access
No
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