Abstract

This paper examines the Jewish holiday poems of Lea Goldberg, written for children during the 1930s and the 1940s and published in the Hebrew children’s newspaper Davar li-yeladim. It opens by examining the role of children’s literature and the appropriation of the Jewish holidays in the Zionist enterprise. Next, Hanukah is taken as a study case, reading Goldberg’s writing against the background of contemporary authors. This comparison sheds light on Goldberg’s distinct voice and approach in the children’s literature sphere during that period. Finally, a discussion of her place in children’s literature is offered in the context of her writings for adults, identifying a common agenda and a consistent stance in all her diverse writings.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3311
Print ISSN
0272-9601
Pages
pp. 28-52
Launched on MUSE
2008-07-31
Open Access
No
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