Abstract

Maternal monitoring and play rules were examined as correlates of children's friendship quality, social behavior, and depression in 6th grade (N = 88). Maternal reports of rules were categorized into three types: supervision rules, peer rules, and restriction rules. Each type of rule was characterized by the number of rules mothers established. Results indicated that monitoring was not significantly correlated with the three types of play rules. Girls who experienced more monitoring had friendships with less conflict and higher positive qualities. Supervision rules were positively related to boys' prosocial behavior and depression. Peer rules were significantly correlated with peer-rated behavior but not with friendship quality. The importance of distinguishing among various aspects of maternal management is discussed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-0266
Print ISSN
0272-930X
Pages
pp. 360-377
Launched on MUSE
2002-10-01
Open Access
No
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