Abstract

The active commitment to Austrian nationalism by the novelist Caroline Pichler contrasts strikingly with her declared view that women should avoid politics and remain in the domestic sphere. Drawing on her memoirs, this article argues that this contradiction results from her ambivalence toward two female role models: her mother and the Empress Maria Theresia, known as "Mother of Her Peoples." This ambivalence also underlies the portrayal of women engaged in a national cause in Pichler's novel The Swedes in Prague (Die Schweden in Prag, 1827). (RR)

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Additional Information

ISSN
1940-512X
Print ISSN
1058-7446
Pages
pp. 34-48
Launched on MUSE
2008-03-24
Open Access
No
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