Quality of Anticoagulation Control: Do Race and Language Matter?
Abstract

Abstract:

No studies have evaluated the quality of anticoagulation control among populations characterized by low socioeconomic status, diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, or limited English proficiency. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the effects of race/ethnicity and language on anticoagulation outcomes among patients (N=864) receiving continuous anticoagulation services at a university-affiliated public hospital. White/non-Hispanic patients made up 24%, Asian/Pacific Islanders 33%, Hispanics 22%, African Americans 18%. English (63%), Spanish, (14%), and Cantonese (13%) were the most common languages. Mean time in therapeutic range (TTR) was 43%. After adjustment, TTR was lower for African Americans than for Whites (absolute difference, –8.7%, p<.001) and for Spanish-speaking than for English-speaking Hispanics (absolute difference, –7.2%, p<.05). There were no differences between Asian/Pacific Islanders and Whites, nor between Cantonese-speaking and English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islanders. Future research should examine mechanisms by which race/ethnicity and language affect quality of anticoagulation and evaluate programs to improve treatment in diverse communities.