Abstract

Site design is an essential but overlooked underpinning to the festival-making process at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Through effective layout, structures, and captioning, spatial strategies undergird a program concept and crystallize the interpretive frame for performance. This article traces the 1989 Hawai'i program's site design from the initial concept to the preperformance stage. It examines the tension between hegemonic festival parameters and the organizers' efforts to problematize colonially inflected narratives, and it argues that rather than being a passive backdrop for performance, the Hawai'i program site design was a discursive field rife with contradiction and conflict.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1535-1882
Print ISSN
0021-8715
Pages
pp. 35-59
Launched on MUSE
2008-01-10
Open Access
N
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.