Abstract

Bioethics commissions have been critiqued on the basis that they are not sufficiently public or are too reliant upon expertise to have legitimacy or authority in regard to public policy debates. Adequately assessing the legitimacy and authority of commissions requires thinking clearly about the "publics" these commissions serve, the primary tasks of public bioethics, and how those tasks might be performed with a certain kind of ethical expertise and limited authority that makes them legitimate players in public policy debates concerning bioethics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3249
Print ISSN
1054-6863
Pages
pp. 143-152
Launched on MUSE
2007-11-08
Open Access
No
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