Abstract

This essay considers Edmund Burke's prosecution of Warren Hastings in the context of Burke's concerns about the Company's feudal structure, which was exacerbated under Hastings's tenure. Taking up the longstanding association of Burke with tradition in general, and with ad hoc apologia for Britain's feudal past in particular, I suggest, by contrast, that in his observations about Hastings's rule and the Company's monopoly, Burke offers a trenchant critique of the feudal logic that underwrites this historical moment of capitalism's imprinting.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 55-69
Launched on MUSE
2007-11-01
Open Access
No
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