Bibliographemes
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Callaloo 30.2 (2007) 443-444

Bibliographemes
translated by Isis McElroy

a sheer thread connects me to the dias
poric literary world
there is always a large amount of debris but
sometimes providence other times recent tracks left behind
steer me to poems of men and
women which demand attention

i've browsed through the african continent
its mental culinary from cabinda
which doesn't quite fit
the lusitanian shape of words
weedy lazio
helps to understand a little better
our seasonings ingredients
islamic blacks
mangoes from goa
jorge de sena a polemicist e. pound
megalomaniac buddy bellicosongbird
or whatever this may mean
in a real deal ulyssean lusiad

and then the sudden apparition of this face
slowly streaming between volumes
through lines of poems this feminine figure
outlines its shape for my appetite
for my library termite curiosity:
irene lisbon*
a fescennine definition for her poetry:
it is as if she had given her bivalvular conch
some of it to pessoa some of it
to bandeira but taking pleasure in the best they have to offer
sequined tongues and fellatio
irene lisbon
without the antimoisturizers of the masculine metalanguage [End Page 442]
tenderly masturbates and then
smells her fingers
moist from exploring the origins of life
kind irene

Ronald Augusto is author of Disco and Puya, volumes of poems. He lives in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

Isis Mcelroy is an assistant professor of Afro-Brazilian literature and culture at Arizona State University.

Note

* Black Irene/ Kind Irene/ Irene always in a good mood./ I imagine Irene entering heaven:/ -"Say there, sir, is it all right if I come in?"/ And Saint Peter, good-natured,/ -"-Come on in, Irene. You don't have to stand there asking." ("Irene in Heaven" translated by Candace Slater; in This Earth That Sky: Poems by Manuel Bandeira, U of California P, 1989)

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