Abstract

This paper examines the debate in the late 19th and early 20th centuries over the acceptability of atomic and molecular physics. It focuses on three prominent figures: Maxwell, who defended atomic physics, Ostwald, who initially rejected it but changed his mind as a result of experiments by Thomson and Perrin, and Duhem, who never accepted it. Each scientist defended the position he did in the light of strongly held methodological views concerning empirical evidence. The paper critically evaluates each of these methodological positions.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9274
Print ISSN
1063-6145
Pages
pp. 359-390
Launched on MUSE
2007-10-15
Open Access
No
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