Abstract

This study was conducted to assess whether friendship quality and gender moderate the association between peer victimization and internalizing distress. Third-,fourth-, and fifth-grade children (N = 670; 315 girls, 355 boys) completed self-report measures of friendship quality, relational and overt physical victimization, anxiety, and depression. Results indicated that several aspects of positive friendship quality, including help and security, serve as effective buffers against both relational and overt victimization. These results were found for girls only and for both anxiety and depression. Results highlight the importance of positive friendship features as protective factors in the link between victimization and internalizing distress.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-0266
Print ISSN
0272-930X
Pages
pp. 439-460
Launched on MUSE
2007-08-13
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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