Abstract

William Wager, the mid-sixteenth century moral dramatist, is typically dismissed as a Protestant propagandist, but I argue that his deployment of literary and performance conventions veils a critique of the emerging capitalist state and its middling Protestant officials. Attacking ambition in The Longer Thou Livest, the More Fool Thou Art and Enough is As Good As a Feast, Wager calls for a turn to conscience. Through allusions to the Guernsey martyrdom, and his promotion of a casuistic weighing of things indifferent, he negotiates his own problematic contribution to the system and the dangers of writing polemical plays.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 305-329
Launched on MUSE
2007-06-11
Open Access
No
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