Abstract

Women in Statius's Silvae appear frequently and prominently. Focusing on Silvae 1.2 and 5.1, this paper examines how Statius consciously creates portraits of Violentilla (1.2) and Priscilla (5.1) which both reflect these historical figures and also embody the traditional feminine ideals appropriate to the celebratory occasions and corresponding poetic genres in which they appear (epithalamium and epicedion respectively). This approach relies in part on Pierre Bourdieu's sociological theories: ultimately Statius exploits his feminine constructs to fulfill his primary poetic purpose, namely to create distinction (symbolic capital) for the poems' male addressees.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6504
Print ISSN
0004-0975
Pages
pp. 165-181
Launched on MUSE
2007-06-04
Open Access
No
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