Abstract

This paper examines how Statius sets up his portrait of Domitian as host in Silvae 4.2 through a series of interrelated allusions, mostly to the epic tradition. Though the poem is often read as a flattering panegyric, in keeping with Domitian's own use of feasting as part of his self-presentation as a benevolent emperor, an analysis of the pattern of allusions employed in the poem suggests a more complex text. The portrait of Domitian that emerges is consistent with the negative portrayal of Domitian's hospitality sketched by later writers, particularly with Pliny's description of Domitian at Panegyricus 48.3-6.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6504
Print ISSN
0004-0975
Pages
pp. 223-244
Launched on MUSE
2007-06-04
Open Access
No
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