Abstract

Roman artistic works from the Augustan period begin to use the bodies of women, but also of men and children, to represent the empire as a household with Augustus as its head. Such representations manipulate developing metaphors of family loyalty and paternal control to express the transformative power of Augustus's imperial policies that made former enemies into subjects or cooperative participants in Roman society. The poetry of Ovid reveals the pervasiveness of this imagery and the range of interpretations placed upon it by a member of the elite now subject to an emperor.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6504
Print ISSN
0004-0975
Pages
pp. 43-71
Launched on MUSE
2007-01-25
Open Access
No
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