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Comparative Technology Transfer and Society 4.3 (2006) 340-346

List of Contributors

Articles

Thomas P. Huber
University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

Tom Huber is a professor of Geography and Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs (UCCS). Tom received his B.S. degree in geography from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1969. In 1975, he started graduate school at Syracuse University and received his M.A. in geography in January of 1977. From 1977 to 1980, he taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy. Tom gained his Ph.D. in geography from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1980. He taught at Colgate University for a year then came back to Colorado and UCCS where he has been a faculty member in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies ever since. He is also the Dean of the Graduate School and the Associate Vice Chancellor for Research at UCCS. He can be reached at thuber@uccs.edu.

David A. Biggs
University of California—Riverside

David Biggs is an assistant professor in the History Department at UC Riverside. His research and teaching covers interests in Vietnam, Southeast Asia, environmental history, and water history. He is currently writing a book on historical water landscapes in the Mekong Delta and is conducting new research into environmental and technological legacies of the Vietnam War in Southeast Asia. He can be reached at david.biggs@ucr.edu. [End Page 340]

Heather J. Hoag
University of San Francisco

Heather Hoag is assistant professor of History and coordinator of African Studies at the University of San Francisco. She received her doctorate in history from Boston University in 2003. She was formerly the program co-ordinator for Oxfam America's Horn of Africa and Southern African programs. Her current research is on the construction of hydroelectric dams in Africa. She can be reached at hjhoag@usfca.edu.

Curtis D. Holder
University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

Curt Holder is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. He works at the nexus of hydrology, biogeography, and human–environment interactions in tropical montane cloud forests of the Sierra de las Minas Biosphere Reserve in Guatemala. Results from his studies have contributed to theory of vegetation influences on watershed management by addressing the significance of fog precipitation in hydrological models. His current research focuses on three topical areas, including vegetation– atmosphere processes in tropical montane cloud forests, foliar biogeography and ecology, and human influences on forest change in Guatemala. He can be reached at cholder@uccs.edu.

Mark Stephan
Washington State University

Mark Stephan is an assistant professor of Political Science at Washington State University, Vancouver. Stephan is a graduate of the University of California, Santa Cruz, and received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2001. He has received highly competitive grant funding from the National Science Foundation to support his research on environmental policy and administration, and he has published several articles in scholarly journals.

John C. Pierce
The Oregon Historical Society, Emeritus

John Pierce is retired executive director of the Oregon Historical Society, Vice Chancellor Emeritus of the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and Research Professor at Washington State University, Vancouver. John is a graduate of the University of Puget Sound and received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1969. He has published numerous books and scholarly articles in the areas of political behavior, public [End Page 341] opinion, political culture, and environmental policy, including Political Culture and Public Policy in Canada and the United States; Critical Masses: Citizens, Nuclear Weapons Production and Environmental Destruction in the United States and Russia, and Public Knowledge and Environmental Politics in Japan and the United States.

Nicholas P. Lovrich, Jr.
Washington State University

Nicholas Lovrich is a Claudius O. and Mary W. Johnson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Washington State University, Pullman, and serves as the director of the Division of Governmental Studies and Services. Nicholas is a graduate of Stanford University and received his...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3404
Print ISSN
1542-0132
Pages
pp. 340-346
Launched on MUSE
2007-01-02
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Ceased Publication
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