Abstract

Livy's history recounts several events that take place, years apart, at the temple of Juno at Croton. A reading, both intertextual and intratextual, of passages having to do with the temple argues that the repeated references to the place form a strand of narrative complementing the main thread of Livy's account of Rome's expansion. Moreover, the temple unites geography and history, for it stands at the edge of each, at the place where Italy ends and the ocean begins and where Livy's narrative meets and responds to those of other writers.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2575-7199
Print ISSN
2575-7180
Pages
pp. 389-414
Launched on MUSE
2006-12-06
Open Access
No
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