Abstract

Fraternity men (N = 261) at a small to midsized public university saw one of two versions of a rape prevention program or were in a control group. Program participants reported significant increases in empathy toward rape survivors and significant declines in rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault. Program participants' scores significantly differed from an untreated control group in several areas. Implications for describing a male-on-male rape to increase men's empathy toward female survivors and other related attitudes are discussed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 133-148
Launched on MUSE
2006-03-08
Open Access
No
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