Abstract

In this essay I argue that Kuhn's account of science, as it was articulated in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, was mainly defended on philosophical rather than historical grounds. I thus lend support to Kuhn's later claim that his model can be derived from first principles. I propose a transcendental reading of his work and I suggest that Kuhn uses historical examples as anti-essentialist Wittgensteinian "reminders" that expose a variegated landscape in the development of science.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1530-9274
Print ISSN
1063-6145
Pages
pp. 495-530
Launched on MUSE
2006-02-20
Open Access
No
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