Abstract

James's repudiation of Austen belies a filiation between them visible in their mutual interest in the old maid, a figure with which James associates Austen, with which James has been associated, and with which he associates himself. Discussing James's references to Austen alongside comparisons between them in criticism and popular culture, the essay considers the way Austen has been missed (neglected and recalled) in relation to James and suggests that, for both, the old maid represents the interplay of sex and knowledge; the old maid's language of excess (her "as it were") is a saying of all that she knows.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 1-9
Launched on MUSE
2006-02-08
Open Access
No
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