Abstract

This article surveys the history of KoreaÕs heritage management laws and administration beginning with the current divisions of the Office of Cultural Properties and tracing its structure back to the 1916 Japanese Preservations Laws governing Korean remains and relics. It focuses on the eighty-year-old bureaucratic process that has led to the creation of a distinct Korean patrimony, now codified and ranked in the nationally designated registry of cultural properties (Chijong munhwajae). Due to the long-standing perceived "authentic" status of this sanctified list of widely recognized "Korean" national treasures, they have been preserved, reconstructed, and exhibited as tangible symbols of Korean identity and antiquity since the early colonial era.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1529
Print ISSN
0145-840X
Pages
pp. 72-95
Launched on MUSE
2001-12-01
Open Access
No
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