Abstract

Forsyth County, Georgia, was one of the fastest growing counties in the nation during the 1990s. This paper examines how it benefited from the general Atlanta boom yet grew through differentiating itself both from the central city and neighboring suburban counties. The irony of rapid development is that issues such as pollution and heavy traffic have made Forsyth's 'go-it-alone' attitude progressively more untenable, while the county is now increasingly indistinguishable from much of the rest of Atlanta. Framed within David Harvey's notion of structured coherence, this paper argues that Forsyth provides an excellent example of intra-urban competition amid the uneven development of a metropolitan region.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1549-6929
Print ISSN
0038-366X
Pages
pp. 104-119
Launched on MUSE
2005-06-20
Open Access
No
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