Abstract

This paper explores representations of geographical displacement in the work of American poet Elizabeth Bishop in relation to ideas of imagined places and an imaginary "home." It focuses on Bishop's late poem "Crusoe in England," in which she offers a revisionary account of one of the prime European travel narratives, and it compares Bishop's Crusoe to those of Caribbean poet Derek Walcott's "Crusoe Island" and South African J. M. Coetzee's Foe, mapping how by rediscovering Crusoe, out of a profound experience of multiple displacement, the writers discover many ways of writing home.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1456
Print ISSN
0162-4962
Pages
pp. 43-53
Launched on MUSE
2005-06-15
Open Access
No
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