Abstract

Both "The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere" and Frankenstein self-consciously reflect on the power of narratives of the unknown and the unexplored, paying particular attention to the way these stories inspire imitation, whether in the physical world or on the page. Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem and Mary Shelley's novel exhibit a tension between their attraction to stories of the unknown and their repulsion by the effects of unbridled exploration. This essay examines their shared reliance on the domestic affections as the primary tool for restraining the pursuit of new worlds.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 693-713
Launched on MUSE
2004-11-17
Open Access
No
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