Abstract

This article explores the viability of the tropes of trauma and mourning in Samuel Beckett's Texts for Nothing. Beckett's work decomposes the initial premise of trauma and mourning: the idea of the subject within history. Texts for Nothing places the narrator in a timeless space, a space beyond history. Mourning presupposes a subject within history, a subject able to contain his or her trauma within a narrative, historical, frame. Because Texts for Nothing offers itself as a dismantling of narrative, these thirteen texts function as a critique of mourning and as a critique of the very idea of trauma.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-658X
Print ISSN
0026-7724
Pages
pp. 332-350
Launched on MUSE
2004-06-29
Open Access
No
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