Abstract

What is to be gained by drawing literary comparisons between the African Diaspora experience of slavery and the Jewish experience of the Holocaust? Can such comparisons be made without distorting the historical record? This article critiques the juxtaposition of tragedy found in The Pawnbrokeróboth the novel and the film versionóand offers a reading of Cynthia Ozick's The Shawl as a polemical response to The Pawnbroker. Two Holocaust-related novels by the West Indian writer Caryl Phillips are then examined as models of how a literary text can enact a "facing" of black and Jewish experience through the postmodern technique of narrative fragmentation and juxtaposition.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1476-7937
Print ISSN
8756-6583
Pages
pp. 46-67
Launched on MUSE
2004-05-28
Open Access
No
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