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Project MUSE Advisory Board

The Project MUSE Advisory Board makes a vital contribution to the long-term vision of Project MUSE.  The membership of the Board provides representation for the diverse communities that Project MUSE brings together: independent and not-for-profit publishers, academic librarians, and scholars working in the humanities and social sciences.  The Board helps Project MUSE sharpen its mandate by identifying and serving the common interests of these communities.  Members serve as advocates for Project MUSE in their respective communities. 

Advisory Board Members

Patrick Alexander
Peter Brantley
Richard Brown
Neil Fraistat
Bob Horton
Mary Murrell
Isidro Rivera
Susan Skomal
Kizer Walker
Charles Watkinson

Patrick Alexander

Patrick Alexander
Director, Penn State University Press

Alexander was appointed director of the Penn State University Press in 2009.  Prior to his appointment he was the  Associate Director and Editor-in-chief and the Co-director of Penn State University Libraries’ Office of Digital Scholarly Publishing. He has been involved in academic publishing for more than 25 years, having worked for Walter de Grutyer (Berlin/New York), Brill Academic Publishers (Leiden/Boston), and Hendrickson Publishers (Peabody, Massachusetts). Alexander has been active in industry-related events, such as the Charleston Library Conference and the Association of American University Presses, and he serves on the editorial board for SPARC’s (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) campus-based publishing initiative. He is the author of several articles concerning issues of scholarly publishing, including essays on peer-review and marketing of scholarly works. He has conducted workshops on scholarly communication, writing, and academic publishing for more than 20 years.


Peter Brantley

Peter Brantley
Director, Digital Library Applications, New York Public Library

Peter most recently was chief strategist for Hypothes.is, a distributed, open-source platform for the collaborative evaluation of information.  He will identify the key challenges to the successful deployment of open annotation within the scholarly community.  Prior to his appointment at Hypothes.is in February, 2013, Peter was the Director of the Bookserver Project at the Internet Archive, a San Francisco-based not-for-profit library.  He has served as the Executive Director of the Digital Library Federation; was a board member of the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF); is a contributing editor for Publishers Weekly for libraries, copyright, and internet publishing; and has held key technical roles at several major research universities, directing the development of large-scale digital library services.


Richard Brown

Richard Brown
Director, Georgetown University Press

Brown began his work in publishing as an editor at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia, a research institute studying international affairs and the presidency. He then spent nine years in religion publishing, first as an editor at Pilgrim Press and then as director of Westminster John Knox Press. In 2001, he began his tenure as director of Georgetown University Press. The Press was founded in 1964, and has been a member of AAUP since 1986. Under Brown’s leadership, the Press has strengthened its reputation in its core subject areas, including languages and linguistics, international affairs, and public policy. Brown also acquires books in Bioethics, Religion & Politics, and Religion & Ethics for the Press.

His distinguished academic achievements include a PhD in religious studies from the University of Virginia, an MA in theological studies from Emory University; an MBA from the University of Louisville; and an AB in English, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Neil Fraistat

Neil Fraistat
Director, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities

Neil Fraistat, Professor of English at the University of Maryland, received his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. He currently chairs the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) and is Co-Founder and Co-Chair of centerNet, an international network of digital humanities centers. Fraistat has published widely on the subjects of Romanticism, Textual Studies, and Digital Humanities in such journals as PMLA, JEGP, Studies in Romanticism, Text, and Literary and Linguistic Computing, as well as in such books as The Poem and the Book, Poems in Their Place, and The “Prometheus Unbound” Notebooks. A founder and general editor of the Romantic Circles Website, he is the coeditor of Reimagining Textuality: Textual Studies in the Late Age of Print; The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley (3 vols. to date); the Norton Critical edition, Shelley’s Poetry and Prose; an edition of Helen Maria Williams’s Letters Written in France, and the forthcoming Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship. Fraistat currently serves on the boards of the Society for Textual Scholarship; the Keats-Shelley Association; Project MUSE; INKE; NITLE Digital Humanities Council; Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth Century Electronic Scholarship (NINES); Brown’s Women Writer’s Project; Studies in Romanticism; and Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net (RaVoN). He has been awarded the Society for Textual Scholarship’s biennial Fredson Bowers Memorial Prize, the Keats-Shelley Association Prize, honorable mention for the Modern Language Association’s biennial Distinguished Scholarly Edition Prize, and the Keats-Shelley Association’s Distinguished Scholar Award.

Bob Horton

Bob Horton
Associate Director for Library Services, Institute of Museum and Library Services

As the IMLS Associate Deputy Director for Library Services, Robert Horton is responsible for the management of the discretionary grant programs in the Office of Library Services. Horton has most recently served as state archivist and director of the library, publications, and collections division at the Minnesota Historical Society.

Horton studied and taught history at Brown, Ohio State, Indiana University, and Yale, then started his archival career at the State Archives of Indiana. Among other activities, he was on the advisory boards of the College of St. Catherine’s Library and Information School and the Legacy Tobacco Document Library at the University of California San Francisco and chaired the Center for Legislative Archives’ Descriptive Practices Working Group.

Horton has worked most closely with digital content and electronic records projects, directing the Minnesota Historical Society’s National Digital Information and Infrastructure Preservation Program initiative. He also worked with legislative digital content and its preservation; the immigrant oral history online project, funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services; the National Newspaper Digitization Program, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities; and the digitization of Swedish language newspapers, in collaboration with the National Library of Sweden.

Mary Murrell

Mary Murrell
Center for the Humanities and Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Mary Murrell is a Lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a Ph.D. in sociocultural anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research has received support from the National Science Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, and the Andrew H. Mellon Foundation. In 2010-2011 she served on UC Berkeley’s Faculty Senate Library Committee and, in 2011-2012, on the University of California Systemwide Faculty Committee on the Library and Scholarly Communication (UCOLASC). Before earning her Ph.D. in 2012, Mary was, from 1991-2004, an acquisitions editor at Princeton University Press, where she acquired titles in the humanities and social sciences. She is currently completing a book manuscript entitled The Open Book: The Social Entanglements of Digitization.


Isidro Rivera

Isidro Rivera
Associate Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, University of Kansas

Isidro J. Rivera received his B.A. from Columbia University and has earned the M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Illinois, Urbana.

His principal area of research is medieval narrative, with a special emphasis on the literature of fifteenth-century Spain. He has edited with Donna Rogers a critical edition and study of the Historia de la doncella Teodor (Binghamton, NY: Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, 2000). Presently, Rivera is finishing a study of the impact of print culture on devotional literature during the reign of the Isabel de Castilla. A participant in NEH Summer Institute on the Alfonsine Contributions to Medieval Spanish Literature and Culture sponsored by the University of Kentucky, Rivera has finished an edition of the Brussels exemplar of the Historia de la Linda Melosina (Toulouse, 1489). Rivera has organized special sessions on the Libro de buen amor, Cárcel de amor, and Celestina for the International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan. His publications on medieval literature have appeared in Journal of Hispanic Philology, Modern Language Notes, Celestinesca, and Hispanic Review. He has co-authored with Kimberly Nance Técnicas de composición (Houghton, Mifflin, 2003). Rivera has directed the University of Kansas Program in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, and the Kansas Spanish Summer Language Institute, Barcelona. A member of the Renaissance Society of America, and the Medieval Association of the Midwest, Rivera is the current Managing Editor of La corónica: A Journal of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures and serves on the Executive Committee, MLA Division on Spanish Medieval Language and Literature, and on the Editorial Board of The Medieval and Early Modern Iberian World (Brill). He is a recipient of a Cramer Award in recognition of excellence in teaching.


Susan Skomal

Susan Skomal
President and CEO, BioOne 

Susan Skomal is President and CEO of BioOne. BioOne was launched in 2001 as an innovative not-for-profit collaboration among scientific societies, libraries, academe, and the private sector to provide cost-effective access to high quality biological, ecological, and environmental science research. The organization provides a platform, as well as distribution, marketing and sales services to nonprofit publishers for the full-texts of bioscience research journals. In 2013, BioOne launched its own Open Access publication, Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene, designed to facilitate scientific solutions to the challenges presented by this era of accelerated human impact. The project is a collaborative effort between BioOne and five major libraries to ensure that we keep our focus on the publication of timely, high quality research to advance the intellectual agenda of science.

Before joining BioOne, Susan directed the publications department of the American Anthropological Association, where she guided the program to the electronic future with the support of an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant. As editor ofAnthroNewsand press officer (1993-2000), she received grants from the Alfred P. Sloan to produce two annual series of topical articles. Susan earned a Ph.D. from UCLA. Trained as an anthropologist with specialties in archaeology and linguistics, Skomal has a healthy respect for the evolutionary force of natural selection — particularly helpful as the scholarly community undergoes its own transformation in the electronic environment.


Kizer Walker

Kizer Walker
Director of Collection Development, Cornell University Library

Kizer is the Director of Collection Development at Cornell University Library and serves as the Library’s bibliographer for German Studies as well as for classics, archaeology, and ancient Near Eastern studies. He is also the Managing Editor of the book series, Signale: Modern German Letters, Cultures and Thought (co-published by the Library and the Cornell University Press).  Since joining Cornell University Library in 2001, he has managed projects in several areas of print and digital librarianship, including scholarly communications and digital library initiatives in mathematics and the history of technology. He is a member of the adjunct faculty of Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in German Studies from Cornell and an M.L.S. from Syracuse University.


Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson
Director, University of Michigan Press

Prior to his appointment at Michigan, Watkinson was the Director of Purdue University Press and the former Director of Publications at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. His degree from Cambridge University is in Archaeology and Anthropology, and he continued to do fieldwork until 2010, most recently as a co-director of the Shala Valley Project in Northern Albania. Watkinson edited, with Michael L. Galaty of Millsaps College, Archaeology under Dictatorship, published by Springer in 2004. As a member of the Board of Directors of both the Society for Scholarly Publishing and the Association of American University Presses, he is heavily involved with wider issues of scholarly communication. Watkinson also chairs and speaks at a number of seminars on scholarly communication issues.

Ex officio

  • Kathleen Keane, Director, Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Dean Smith, Director, Project MUSE
  • Terry Ehling, Associate Director, Project MUSE
  • Bill Breichner, Publisher, Journals Division, Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Deborah Slingluff, Associate Director for Library Services and Collections, Sheridan Libraries, Johns Hopkins University